Review of the eMicro Electric Scooter

I finally got my hands on the eMicro from Micro Scooters a couple of weeks ago and I’ve been having a blast riding it around Boston.  I also took it to Long Island, New York over Memorial Day Weekend. As I wrote about in an earlier post, It’s the lightest electric scooter on the market at 16.5 pounds. With this new vehicle in my arsenal, I can now travel much farther with less effort. The picture below of the scooter’s box cover provides its key stats:

eMicro Box

Light does not mean flimsy. On the contrary, it is made of high quality, robust parts and it is incredibly high-tech. The scooter is motion-controlled which means that the motor engages based on the rider’s movements. To make sure the rider is ready for the motor to kick in, she/he has to be going at 3mph before the motor engages. The back of the deck is packed with sensors and when you perform a scooter kick, the scooter will continue to accelerate until it reaches a maximum speed of 15 mph. This “kick assist” technology makes riding more fun when compared to riding a standard electric scooter that is either “on” or “off”.

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Transportation and health: living near highways is a health risk

There have been several articles recently about the impact of modes of transportation on  health; for example, car drivers have higher BMIs, on average, than bikers and public transit riders (see WBUR’s recent series on traffic).  But, there has been less focus on the impact of vehicle pollution on the health of city dwellers. I just learned of a study in this area at a Mass DOT planning meeting today. One of the speakers, a Tufts researcher who was advocating for an extension of the Green Line train to Medford, discussed the results of a  Tufts / Boston University study on the higher health risks present in populations living close to highways.

The Boston Globe wrote about this research in April of this year: “New Evidence of the Dangers of Living near Highways”. The study looked at the blood chemistry of individuals living close to I-93 and the Mass Turnpike to those living half a mile away from these highways. Results show that individuals living within 500 feet of a highway have higher levels of three chemicals that are associated with heart disease, lung cancer and asthma. The areas studied were:Chinatown, Dorchester, Sommerville and Medford. One of the immediate actions being taken following this study is the migration of a park in Chinatown. Real estate developers and architects who are learning about these issues are talking about improving air filtration systems.

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New P2P Service for Unique Wheels: Rent a Segway and more at oWheelClub

Peer-2-peer businesses have permeated every retail segment, from real estate to camping equipment. In the personal transportation space, individuals have been able to share bikes (see Spinlister) and cars. But, those seeking alternative wheels (think Segways, electric scooters and unicycles) haven’t had a P2P space to go to, until now. Geneva-based oWheelClub recently launched to give individuals around the world the opportunity to rent a unique set of wheels from early adopters. P2P for these unique products makes a lot of sense, both for consumers and manufacturers of these new vehicles. The platform will allow individuals to try out expensive products before they commit to a purchase. The founder of oWheelClub also sees the service meeting the needs of travelers who want to visit a city differently and providing a new type of entertainment.

If you live in Boston, my solar panel electric scooter is now available for rent (cheaper than renting a Segway for the day BTW). So, for all of you who secretly desire to try an electric scooter, no more excuses: oWheelClub makes the transaction smooth and transparent. Check it out!

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Do Navigation Apps Feed Our Driving Addiction? Not Citymapper

We’re all hooked on navigation apps and can’t remember what life was like without‘em. For the direction challenged, apps that give you turn-by-turn instructions are saviors. Their up-to-date travel time estimates increase the predictability of commutes.  Without a doubt, these apps reduce commuting stress and bring happier commutes. But, while their benefits are significant, they have also made driving easier.

The decision to drive usually makes sense when minimizing commute time is the key goal. But, if your goal is to maximize enjoyment during the trip (whatever that means for you), or minimize travel costs, the fastest option may not be the answer. Maybe you can allot 30 minutes to a trip, so getting there in 15 minutes is not necessarily ideal. Future navigation apps should be able to help commuters optimize their route based on multiple goals, not just travel time.

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Electric Mobility Innovation Round-up – Electric rollerblades and more

Here is a roundup of the latest in electric personal transportation equipment covered by Gizmag or discovered on Kickstarter:

Electric rollerblades: I had seen off-road roller-skates and roller blades before but I had never come across electric rollerblades until I read about Polish inventor’s Jack Skopinsi new off-road electric rollerblades. He designed these in response to customer requests for portable personal transportation that could be carried in a bag. Cost is around $1,200.

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Jack Skopinski’s Off-Road Electric Rollerblades

Electric scooter and e-bikes: ETT industries designed one of each. As Gizmag reports, the firm won a design award for the bike’s unconventional industrial design. The range on these vehicles is 50 miles (impressive) after a 5-hour charge. The scooter can travel up to 45 km/h while the bike’s top speed is 25 km/h. Scooters are more expensive at $3.8K while bikes are $2.4K.

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e-Scooter from ETT Industries

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Go Boston 2030: Transportation Access Plans

Boston is a highly walkable city (ranks third for walkability) but a study by the University of Minnesota’s Center for Transportation Studies shows that Boston’s public transit system doesn’t rank as highly, particularly when measuring jobs accessibility via public transit; Boston ranks third in the nation for employment, but sixth in the nation for job accessibility (based on the number of jobs accessible within a 30-minute commute). Apparently car-loving LA has better accessibility via public transit.

This issue of access to reliable transportation is being addressed through Go Boston 2030, Boston’s first transportation plan in 50 years. Access is one of three key goals for Go Boston 2030 (the other two are safety and reliability). The city’s goal for access is for every household to be “within a 10-minute walk of a rail station or key bus route, Hubway station [Boston’s bike sharing system], and car-share.” As a side note, it is interesting that car-sharing is considered an alternative to public transportation when a key goal for Boston 2030 is to reduce single-driver commutes by half in 2030 (from 40% of commutes to 20% of commutes). However, I do admire the Boston Transportation Department for putting out a very measurable goal that will give Boston households an alternative to owning a car.

Your-vision

Access to public transit is not equal across Boston neighborhoods, so I learned last week during Go Boston’s 2030 scenario workshops. Not surprisingly, lower-income neighborhoods and neighborhoods with a high representation of non-white households tend to have poor public transit service; buses and commuter rails are too far to walk to and they are less reliable than public transit in more affluent neighborhoods. And walking often feels unsafe due to speeding drivers. As a result, individuals in these neighborhoods are more likely to be car dependent. Under 15% of Bostonians live in car dependent places, but this rises to over 30% for those in the lower income bracket (see Go Boston 2030’s Vision report).

These discrepancies in transit service mean that lower-income neighborhoods should see a larger share of transit investments over the next decade compared to more affluent neighborhoods. It appears that a key focus will be improving and/or adding transit options to the Longwood Medical Center, a key job center for lower-income neighborhoods. Addressing the transportation issues of these lower-income neighborhoods will not only address Go Boston 2030’s access goals but should accelerate progress towards an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

 

Fun Alt Transport April Fool’s

April 1st is my son’s birthday. Unfortunately, making funny jokes is not in his skill set yet, in spite of his best efforts. He got that unfunny gene from his mom. So this post is not another April Fool’s day hoax but one about the fooleries invented by the alternative transport industry. The most popular ones are those in the grey zone; the ones that don’t seem so foolish. Shareable tandem bicycles and electric scooters – why not? As fads and fashions change rapidly so too might preferred modes of transit.There were many AFDJ (April Fool’s Day Jokes) by bike sharing organizations so I restrained myself to mention only those from cities that I have personal ties to.

London: Santander Cycles received hundreds of likes and retweets for its announcement of Santandems (#Santandems): a tandem bike for two.

Santander bike share AFDJ

Many commentators thought this concept should live beyond April’s Fool day. Responses from Santander Cycles were a bit uninspiring however.

Santander tweets

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French Start-up aims to Tackle Global Warming and Obesity with a Kick Scooter

As a scooter enthusiast, I was very excited to learn about La Galoche, a new French company building an innovative kick scooter, or trotinette, for daily commuting. The founders spent hours brainstorming product ideas with the aim of tackling some of the earth’s most difficult challenges: global warming, unhappiness, and obesity. They all agreed on the kick scooter as the logical answer. As a daily kick scooter rider myself, I couldn’t agree more. Their ambition is to create a scooter that is more elegant, high-tech and functional than the typical adult scooter. Some of the scooter’s unique features include: a built in light, hand and foot breaks, a carrying handle, and a mobile app that gives navigation instructions, tracks calories and distance.

La Galoche Image

The company is part of an incubator (Transalley) based in Valenciennes (northern part of France) focused on transportation / mobility start-ups. In March 2016, they won first place in a mobility start-up competition with their prototype. They are now looking for manufacturers in Northern France. Best of luck to the La Galoche team during the production stage. I can’t wait to test drive their scooter next time I am in France.

Hyperloop on demand: is that really necessary?

Hyperloop

Photo: Elon Musk

I am all about new transportation technology, particularly if it leads to more energy and time efficient travel, but this statement from a recent article on the Hyperloop makes me cringe:

“I think Hyperloop is going to be the fifth mode of transportation incrementally providing options for existing modes and we’ll need to connect with those modes,” he says. “We’ll need to be able to order a Hyperloop on your phone, show up at the station whenever you want and maybe catch an Uber at the other end. And that’s the kind of end to end experience that we think we’ll be delivering in an on-demand economy.”

The hyperloop is a public transportation solution after all, not a personal one.  I hope to live to experience a 30 minute commute between LA and San Fran or Boston and NY at about 1/4th the energy consumption of a two passenger car, but I don’t need to program this ridiculously short commute. Get to the Hyperloop how and when you want, on demand (by Uber, or, my personal favorite, a foldable scooter). But, by all means, have a little patience to wait for the next Hyperloop.

 

 

Boston’s Bold Transportation Plans: GoBoston2030

As a Boston citizen, I am paying attention to the city’s bold transportation plans started by the late Mayor Menino in 2014. Called GoBoston2030, the city’s transportation initiative should be a model for other cities to follow when tackling big policy issues:

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  • It takes a citizen-centric view of transportation; it’s about how people get around and not public transit, biking or walking
  • Program goals are holistic; changes should lead to equity, economic and environmental improvements
  • The program engages citizens in building the future. The City just spent the last 18 months gathering feedback from citizens through multiple street and web-based initiatives such as an “Ideas on the Street” pop-up (bike-trailer) that visited 31 neighborhoods over a period of a month.

The GoBoston2030 initiative generated 5,000 questions about transportation and 3,700 project and policy ideas. Next week, GoBoson2030 gives citizens the opportunity take part in scenario building workshops with policy leaders, planners and engineers where this feedback will turn into possible projects. I intend to be there and will report back.